Science In The News #2 - Nov 5 2017

Why Dozens of Octopuses Marched Out of the Sea


A dolphin-watching tour came across multiple octopuses on the beaches of Ceredigion, Wales. They grabbed plastic containers and moved them back to the deeper water. The next few days they came back to check and found them back on the shore, with a number of them dead. What do scientists think happened to them? Check it out here:
http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/News/News_Main/~3/AfLND4OPhn4/

Ancient Winged Terror Was One of the Largest Animals to Fly


A large pterosaur fossil has been found in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia. They believe it may have had a wingspan of 36ft. Scientists believe this is one of the largest pterosaurs that ever lived. It lived 70 million years ago in a warm, arid climate. The pterosaur has not been named a new species due to the incomplete remains. Check it out here:
http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/News/News_Main/~3/RYMbj-0G95w/

How Mosquitoes Use Stealth to Steal Your Blood


Mosquitoes are the worlds deadliest animal killing over 700,000 humans per year. Scientists observed Anopheles coluzzii mosquitoes with a high speed camera trying to detect how they are able to bite us without us noticing them. They learned that they flap their wings about 600 times a second to take off and push off very slightly so you only notice when it is too late. Check it out here:
http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/News/News_Main/~3/r7rixjwnkPQ/

Horses can read our body language even when they don't know us


A study from the University of Sussex shows that horses can read some body language, even if they do not know the human. They tend to approach a person in a submission posture rather than a dominant posture. Dr. Leanne Props said "Evolutionarily speaking, animals --including humans-- tend to use larger postures to indicate dominance, or threat, and smaller postures to indicate submissiveness." Check it out here:
http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/News/News_Main/~3/r7rixjwnkPQ/

Trade you a Lactobacillus from my gut for a Streptomyces from your yard


A group of scientists wanted to identify bacteria and archaea from all over the world using the same protocols to make sure they can be globally applied to any study. They decided to ask for samples. They received 27,751 samples from all seven continents and were able to subject them all to the same protocol. This became known as the Earth Microbiome Project. Check it out here:
http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/News/News_Main/~3/r7rixjwnkPQ/